The Global Catholic Climate Movement explains what happened at COP25 in Madrid

Right now, climate change costs. Whether it’s in homes destroyed, lives lost, or well-being diminished, climate change is expensive. But those costs are mostly borne by the people who haven’t caused the problem.
– Global Catholic Climate Movement

Editor’s Note: It’s the winter solstice. The shortest day of the year in the northern hemisphere when darkness has reached its peak. But tomorrow we know that our earth begins to bow its northern pole towards our nearest star and longer days will draw us deeper into the light. 

December 25th, the day when Christians celebrate the birth of Christ, reminds us that we are called to live in the light. The warmth, hope, joy and love that Christmas heralds is a reminder that we are Children of God, called to a deeper humanity, with compassion for all sentient beings and respect for all Creation. 

Below we publish a communication from the Global Catholic Climate Movement following the disappointment of COP 25. What happened and its implications are succinctly explained. But we are also reminded that as followers of Christ, called to be people of the light, we must redouble our commitment to creating a new world order in which the peoples of the earth seek to live in harmony with each other and in ever deeper respect for the natural world upon which we all depend. 

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Last weekend, the UN climate talks came to a close in Madrid. The talks lasted two extra days as negotiators kept trying to hammer out a consensus.

The result? Delays, obstructions, and ultimately more business as usual.

There were two factions at the talks. On the one side were irresponsible nations that refuse to own up to their portion of the climate bill that’s already overdue. These nations include the U.S., Brazil, Australia, and Saudi Arabia.

On the other side were responsible nations that pushed for transparency and accountability. These include the European Union and–tragically–the places that are most vulnerable to the climate crisis: small island nations, African nations, and some nations in Latin America.

Negotiators had the opportunity to set rules for an international carbon market that would make countries pay for emitting greenhouse gas emissions.

Right now, climate change costs. Whether it’s in homes destroyed, lives lost, or well-being diminished, climate change is expensive. But those costs are mostly borne by the people who haven’t caused the problem.

A carbon market would make emitters pay. It’s one of the best way to meaningfully reduce emissions and it’s part of the Paris agreement that UN summits are organized to achieve.
But negotiators were unwilling to reach an agreement on the details. So, the can is kicked down the road for another year–a precious year that we don’t have to waste.

I invite you to pray this prayer with me today:

Creator God, Your love is manifest in the very air we breathe.
Let it comfort and refresh us when hope seems small.
Redeemer God, Your grace is manifest in every moment of choice.
Let It heal our wounded world.

In 2020, we will multiply our efforts to bring God’s healing to troubled time. Together, we remain committed to seeing God’s will for love and justice be done in our world.

Blessings,
Christina for GCCM

Global Catholic Climate Movement